Both New Hampshire Reps Receive an A Grade

BOSTON – On July 1 Fight For the Future, in coalition with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and a dozen other organizations, released a report card which rates U.S. Representatives and Senators based on what they have been doing to protect individual privacy in the face of out of control government monitoring.

Anne Kuster - New Hampshire reps receive an A grade for privacyU.S. Representative Ann Kuster (D-2) received an A grade in the report card. The letter grade was calculated based on her positions on the following bills:

Surveillance State Repeal Act: 0
USA FREEDOM Act (original): 4
Conyers-Amash Amendment: 0
Massie-Lofgren Amendment: 3
USA FREEDOM Act (House passed): -2
FISA Transparency and Modernization Act: 0
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Total Score (4 or higher is an A): 5

Carol Shea-PorterU.S. Rep. Carol Shea-Porter (D-1) scored an even higher A for her voting record:

Surveillance State Repeal Act: 0
USA FREEDOM Act (original): 4
Conyers-Amash Amendment: 4
Massie-Lofgren Amendment: 3
USA FREEDOM Act (House passed): 0
FISA Transparency and Modernization Act: 0
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Total Score (4 or higher is an A): 11

New Hampshire Senators Kelly Ayotte and Jeanne Shaheen were not graded in the report card, as they didn’t vote on or sponsor the bills and amendments used to calculate grades. The methodology used, as well as the raw data, are available online.

Fight For the Future (FFTF) is a Boston-based not-for-profit organization “dedicated to expanding the Internet’s transformative power for good”. It’s known for its massive viral organizing campaigns against SOPA, PIPA and CISPA, as well as last month’s Reset the Net event. Its goal is to build a grassroots movement to ensure that everyone can access the Internet affordably, free of any interference or censorship, and with full privacy.

According to its website, FFTF focuses on the following issues:

  • Copyright and patent laws are outdated and overzealous. They hurt artists and innovation, shifting control of our art, media, and ideas to large corporations.

  • Slow speed and limited access: Lack of competition in the U.S. broadband market has resulted in an Internet system that is among the slowest, most expensive and least available among developed nations.

  • Tracking and Spying: People can’t express themselves freely online when they feel like they are being watched. In an extreme form, government and corporate surveillance can lead to political repression.

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